College Board Sued for Soliciting and Selling Students’ Personal Information

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On December 10, 2019, an Illinois parent identified as “Mark S.” filed a class action lawsuit against College Board for soliciting and selling personal information from minor students taking College Board’s standardized tests.

The 38-page complaint, filed in US District Court, District of Northern Illinois, Eastern Division, alleges the following (from the introduction of the case):

Every year, hundreds of thousands of students in Illinois and millions of students across the United States take one or more standardized tests provided by Defendant College Board –including, the SAT, PSAT/NMSQT, PSAT 10, PSAT 8/9and Advanced Placement Exams(“AP Exams”)(collectively, the “Standardized Tests”). While students were made to believe the results of these tests would significantly impact their futures, to Defendant College Board the tests served a wholly different purpose–i.e., to obtain highly valuable personal student information. Defendant College Board obtained the students’ personal information through the use of unfair and deceptive practices…

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This is why we don’t have better readers: Response to Lucy Calkins

Reading Matters

This post is available as a PDF.

Lucy Calkins has written a manifesto entitled “No One Gets To Own The Term ‘Science Of Reading'”. I am a scientist who studies reading.  Her document is not about the science that I know; it is about Lucy Calkins. Dr. Calkins is a prolific pedagogical entrepreneur who has published numerous curricula and supporting materials for teaching reading and writing to children. She is among the most successful, influential reading educators in this country. According to an EdWeek survey published this week, hers is among the 5 most commonly used reading curricula in the country.

The purpose of the document is to protect her brand, her market share, and her standing among her many followers.  Dr. Calkins is not interested in examining the educational implications of reading science.  She is interested in co-opting the term so that the science cannot be used to…

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Book Review: Behind the Screen: Content Moderation in the Shadows of Social Media by Sarah T. Roberts — Impact of Social Sciences

In Behind the Screen: Content Moderation in the Shadows of Social Media, Sarah T. Roberts explores the work conditions and experiences of people employed in ‘commercial content moderation’, drawing on interviews with those tasked with detecting and removing harmful and upsetting online content. As the problems faced by CCM workers reveal the economic, social and political distortions of…

via Book Review: Behind the Screen: Content Moderation in the Shadows of Social Media by Sarah T. Roberts — Impact of Social Sciences

PISA 2018 Results — Education, economics and public policy

PISA 2018 Results (News and Research 174) After two decades of PISA tests, why haven’t scores risen more? Rich-nation education splurge fails to deliver results Pisa star Finland falls down rankings Japanese students drop to country’s lowest-ever rank in reading in international test How do Sweden’s Pisa school results compare to other countries? Pisa rankings: […]

via PISA 2018 Results — Education, economics and public policy

Shortchanging the taxpayer on the full information

The Courier-Journal just posted an article about school taxes titled “As JCPS again ponders tax increase, here’s what to know about school funding in Kentucky” that needs “the rest of the story.” The article bemoans the fact that the state’s SEEK (Seeking Excellence in Education) funding has not kept pace with inflation, saying local school…

via Shortchanging the taxpayer on the full information — The Bluegrass Institute for Public Policy Solutions

College Board Sued over Student Data Collection

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 10, 2019 For Information: Jon Loevy, Loevy & Loevy Attorneys at Law, 312.243.5900, jon@loevy.com Scott Drury, Loevy & Loevy Attorneys at Law, 312.243.5900, drury@loevy.com Andy Thayer, Loevy & Loevy Attorneys at Law, 773.209.1187, andy@loevy.com Student Testing Giant “College Board” Sued for Illegally Collecting & Selling Students’ Data Parent filed a federal […]

via College Board Sued over Student Data Collection — The Underground Parent

Puff Piece, Dept.

traditional math

Just read a rambling article in the Atlanta Journal Constitution by Maureen Dowd that points fingers and doesn’t come to any conclusions. Main point: math ed has been bad in GA for many years so why blame Common Core.

Citing parents’ laments that they wish math could be taught as it was 30 years ago, Dowd asks whether this is really a solution. She states: “But did students learn math more effectively a generation ago? When the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies evaluated numeracy skills of adults in 23 countries, 20 outperformed the United States.”

The study cited aggregates populations from ages 16 to 65. Thus, there are different types of math teaching people were exposed to based on age. However she leaves out this finding, stated in the study: “In the study, people from ages 16-65 in over twenty countries, including the U.S., were…

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ACT’s Push for Use of a “Superscore” Composite– Which Still Underestimates College Freshman GPA

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ACT is promoting “superscoring,” which involves creating a composite score based upon the highest scores of individual subtests across multiple testing sessions.

On August 15, 2019, ACT released a statement about superscoring and how, beginning September 2020, ACT will include a superscore on ACT scoring reports.

Before we get into some details regarding the studies behind ACT’s decision to include superscores on student score reports, let us consider ACT’s statement about how use of a superscore (as opposed to a traditional composite score) is left up to colleges and universities:

…We empirically evaluated the validity and fairness of different score-use policies. Based on the findings, ACT now supports the use of superscoring in making college admissions decisions. And starting in September 2020, ACT will be automatically calculating the superscore for students.

That said, we believe that individual postsecondary institutions should decide which score-use policy is best for them, as…

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Some more food for thought on the Mississippi NAEP situation — The Bluegrass Institute for Public Policy Solutions

(Updated with Added Discussion) One of the big shocks in the 2019 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) was the dramatic rise in fourth grade performance for the State of Mississippi. Whether we look at overall average student scores or break it down by performance for whites and blacks, the two predominant racial groups in…

via Some more food for thought on the Mississippi NAEP situation — The Bluegrass Institute for Public Policy Solutions

Do the Common Core State Standards live on in Kentucky? — The Bluegrass Institute for Public Policy Solutions

Here’s the word from a highly authoritative source Kentucky Board of Education member Gary Houchens just Tweeted out an answer about whether or not the Common Core State Standards are totally gone in Kentucky. The best elements of Common Core remain in KY’s standards, which were revised using a deeply collaborative, teacher-led process outlined by…

via Do the Common Core State Standards live on in Kentucky? — The Bluegrass Institute for Public Policy Solutions