Another Math Miracle, Dept.

traditional math

This promo piece is about Nashua NH public schools adopting Eureka Math. In keeping with the tradition and style of such articles that pass as objective reporting, it contains the usual disparagement of algorithms, memorization, and of course tests that are not “formative”.

To wit and for example:

“It builds student confidence, year by year, by helping students achieve true understanding of math, not just algorithms,” said Fitzpatrick, adding students are focusing on applying math as opposed to memorizing math formulas. By implementing Eureka Math for kindergarten up to eighth grade, she said it will provide a continuous standard progression and help build conceptual understanding and abstract skills. It also encourages consistent math terminology and common assessments that are formative and summative, explained Fitzpatrick.

It is more than a little discouraging to see the premises of Kamii and Dominick (famous for their seminal piece that supposedly provides evidence that teaching…

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Learning Through Play is More Than Play

Paul A. Kirschner & Mirjam Neelen Let children play! Let them figure out and discover stuff themselves! Let them create things! Let them set their own goals and come up with their own ideas! That’s how they learn: naturally! It sounds wonderful. Who would be against it? Really, no one could or would. Who can […]

via Learning Through Play is More Than Play — 3-Star learning experiences

A round-up of favorite posts from the past week — Catherine & Katharine

Dan Willingham on phonics instruction Jasmine Lane and Jon Gustafson on training teachers to fail Howie Knoff on “trauma informed” schools Joanne Jacobs on stop scaring students Burgoyne et al on “growth mindsets” Schlosser et al on no evidence for the Rapid Prompting Method of Facilitated Communication

via A round-up of favorite posts from the past week — Catherine & Katharine

Thorndike (1874 – 1949) – Experimental rigour and why Latin doesn’t give you transferable skills… — Donald Clark Plan B

Edward Thorndike deserves much more attention than he gets in the history of educational psychology. Inspired by William James, he was an assiduous experimenter, who revolutionised experimental psychology by introducing scientific rigour into his work. This led to ground-breaking work in important learning topics such as ‘transfer’, a topic often ignored in learning theory and…

via Thorndike (1874 – 1949) – Experimental rigour and why Latin doesn’t give you transferable skills… — Donald Clark Plan B

Retractions: the good, the bad, and the ugly. What researchers stand to gain from taking more care to understand errors in the scientific record

Retractions play an important role in research communication by highlighting and explaining how research projects have failed and thereby preventing these mistakes from being repeated. However, the process of retraction and the data it produces is often sparse or incomplete. Drawing on evidence from 2046 retraction records, Quan-Hoang Vuong discusses the emerging trends this data…

via Retractions: the good, the bad, and the ugly. What researchers stand to gain from taking more care to understand errors in the scientific record — Impact of Social Sciences

The Verdict Is In: Courtrooms Seldom Overrule Bad Science

https://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/releases/2020-02-pspi-court-data.html?utm_source=APS+Emails&utm_campaign=5450f2972f-PSU_02212020&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_d2c7283f04-5450f2972f-62672163

In television crime dramas, savvy lawyers are able to overcome improbable odds to win their cases by presenting seemingly iron-clad scientific evidence. In real-world courtrooms, however, the quality of scientific testimony can vary wildly, making it difficult for judges and juries to distinguish between solid research and so-called junk science.

Elaboration as Self-explanation — Learning Scientists Blog

By Megan SumerackiLast month (January 2020) I was in Queensland, Australia working with teachers, students, and parents at Brisbane State High School. I had the pleasure and opportunity to run two days worth of workshops with all of the staff in the high school, as well as a session with some of the students and…

via Elaboration as Self-explanation — Learning Scientists Blog – The Learning Scientists

Tuning in, tuning out — Catherine & Katharine

What is the longest period of time a student can focus on a lesson without his/her mind wandering? Probably 15 to 20 minutes, max. I sat in the back of the classroom, observing and taking careful notes as usual. The class had started at 1:00 o’clock. The student sitting in front of me took copious […]

via Tuning in, tuning out — Catherine & Katharine

Why Learning Styles Are Still Useless

Some of you may be educators – or just interested in teaching or information and learning, and you may also have been confronted with learning styles. Yeah, I could identify sometimes with the visual learning style, because I remembered the exact position of some text I was looking for in my mind. Learning styles say, […]

via Why Learning Styles Are Still Useless — Dogma Depot

Conjecture; ‘Thinking like a mathematician’ is a confused concept

Fair schooling & assessment

Conjecture. ‘Thinking like a mathematician’ is a concept confusing cognition of the individual (student, academic, mathematician) and the fruits of centuries of mathematical and scientific research.

This blog is based on a Twitter thread
https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1198527402768515072.html

Teaching students to ‘think like a mathematician’ is a huge waste of effort.
This quote from Whitehead (1911, p. 8) “… mathematics … is necessarily the foundation of exact thought as applied to natural phenomena” refers to science, not to the thinking of an individual (scientist, student).

p. 11 “To see what is general in what is particular and what is permanent in what is transitory is the aim of scientific thought.”
‘Scientific thought’ here is a metaphor for scientific research , it is not meant to be the thinking of the individual scientist.

Whitehead, p. 11:
“In the eye of science, the fall of an…

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