Out on Good Behavior, Dept. — traditional math

I am currently writing a series called “Out on Good Behavior: Teaching Math While Looking Over Your Shoulder” When the series is complete, it will be published in book form by John Catt Educational, Ltd.” The chapters are being published in serial form at the Truth in American Education website. If you are curious, the […]

via Out on Good Behavior, Dept. — traditional math

Feedback that moves learning forward — HARNESSING THE POWER OF ASSESSMENT

Feedback is one of the most powerful influences on learning and achievement, but this impact can be either positive or negative. Hattie & Timperley (2007) Feedback is the engine that powers learning. But from the quote above, it’s clear that not all feedback is effective. This presents a bit of a quandary. How do you […]

via Feedback that moves learning forward — HARNESSING THE POWER OF ASSESSMENT

GUEST POST: Who Benefits More From Peer Feedback: The Giver or the Receiver? — Learning Scientists Blog – The Learning Scientists

By Katie Marquardt Katie Marquardt is a secondary teacher of history, geography, and economics, and has taught at international schools in Myanmar and Cambodia. Cognitive psychology is a special interest of hers, and she is always looking for ways to use education research to improve her classroom practice. She blogs at Pondering Pedagogy and tweets…

via GUEST POST: Who Benefits More From Peer Feedback: The Giver or the Receiver? — Learning Scientists Blog – The Learning Scientists

OPENING DAY — The Concord Review – Will’s Blog

Will FitzhughThe Concord Review15 July 2019The principal should say: “Good morning, boys and girls, and welcome back from vacation.“This year we will have a school for students who want to work hard. Those who do not want to work hard will be removed. We haven’t worked out where they will go yet, but while they are…

via OPENING DAY — The Concord Review – Will’s Blog

What the Attention Economy Does to Workers—and How It Drives America Insane

Two new books argue that the attention economy is unsustainable—for people, and for the planet.According to labor historian E.P. Thompson, pre-industrial societies measured time by task and season. “In Madagascar time might be measured by ‘a rice-cooking’ (about half an hour) or ‘the frying of a locust’ (a moment),” Thompson writes. In 15th-century England, people…

via What the Attention Economy Does to Workers—and How It Drives America Insane — Pacific Standard. Smart Journalism. Real Solutions.

Education Next, the Fordham Institute, and Common Core — Nonpartisan Education Blog

In years of observing the behavior of staff at the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation and Institute I haven’t noticed much of the “open-mindedness and humility” claimed on its website.[1] More common has been a proclivity to suppress dissent, shun or ridicule those who disagree, and promote their in-group as the only legitimate spokespersons for “education…

via Education Next, the Fordham Institute, and Common Core — Nonpartisan Education Blog

The Prospect of a Horrible PD, a Horrible Meeting, and an Unlikely Collaboration — Truth in American Education

Editor’s note: This is the sixth piece in a series called “Out on Good Behavior: Teaching Math While Looking Over Your Shoulder” by Barry Garelick, a second-career math teacher in California. He has written articles on math education that have appeared in The Atlantic, Education Next, Education News and AMS Notices. He is also the author of three books on math education. …

via The Prospect of a Horrible PD, a Horrible Meeting, and an Unlikely Collaboration — Truth in American Education

Keeping Journalists in the Dark: ‘Citation Cartels’ Limit Public Knowledge

https://www.jamesgmartin.center/2019/05/keeping-journalists-in-the-dark-citation-cartels-limit-public-knowledge/#.XN7dlTFVUOo.twitter

The public relies on journalists to learn about and share academic research. Public knowledge can be undermined, however, when academics try to influence what research journalists cover or limit the “acceptable debate” about an issue.

This influence can be achieved through “citation cartels,” where sympathetic researchers cite and reference one another and ignore or dismiss the high-quality research of others that reaches different conclusions. Citation cartels belittle research they disagree with, rather than refute it.

Citation cartels can advance researchers’ careers substantially: Cartel members receive more media exposure and get more academic citations. Universities consider citation numbers as evidence of research productivity and influence, which affects hiring and promotion decisions.

A prime example of this process is media coverage of standardized testing. …

Cartoons about Grades and Report Cards

For this month’s cartoons, I have selected a bunch of cartoons that tickle me about the onerous tasks of judging student performance and behavior on a daily basis and deciding what mark to put down in report cards. Anyone who has taught in K-12 or higher education knows well the tensions, the periodic wincing, and […]

via Cartoons about Grades and Report Cards — Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice