Virginia Parent’s “Guns” Comment at Board Meeting Elicits Police Involvement

deutsch29: Mercedes Schneider's Blog

If you plan to speak your mind at a school board meeting and you know that speaking off of the top of your head is a poor decision for you, don’t ignore your own wisdom. (And maybe don’t publicize pictures of yourself sporting hefty firearms.)

If your time is limited, speak efficiently, on point– and without language that consitutes a Class 1 misemeanor.

On Thursday, January 20, 2022, the Page County (Virginia) School Board held a meeting to consider mitigation strategies for its schools in the wake of COVID-19. Up for consideration was whether to make student mask-wearing mandatory or not. In the end, the board voted to make mask wearing voluntary.

During the public comment period, parent Amelia King made her postition against mandatory masking eventually clear, ending her ramble with an omnious “See you Monday” after saying she would show up with “guns loaded” if the board voted…

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Again: teacher and course evaluations don’t tell you what you think they tell you

We’ve written extensively about this topic in More Myths about Learning and Education, our second myth book, but a new working paper by Vladimir Kogan, Brandon Genetin, Joyce Chen and Alan Kalishagain confirms again: student surveys don’t measure what you think they measure. Grades seem to be the biggest influence in this case – we […]

Again: teacher and course evaluations don’t tell you what you think they tell you — From experience to meaning…

Do university applications favour middle-class kids? Yes – because their parents write them

Britain’s only social mobility professor says personal statements should be scrapped. But the problem takes root much earlierIt wasn’t until my elder daughter applied for university that I became aware of personal statements – 4,000 words with which the applicant can persuade the seat of learning that they are made of the right stuff. I…

Do university applications favour middle-class kids? Yes – because their parents write them | Adrian Chiles — Education | The Guardian

The Dangers of Feelgoodism in Education

Recently, on Twitter, I came across this image: Link to Tweet If you’ve been around edutwitter for any amount of time, you’ve probably seen this exact image or something quite similar. Quite catchy. Seems harmless…but is it really? Think about the message it’s potentially sending to those who see it. Attitude is more important that…

The Dangers of Feelgoodism in Education — The Effortful Educator

Is doing a PhD bad for your mental health?

Poor mental health amongst PhD researchers is increasingly being recognised as an issue within higher education institutions. However, there continues to be unanswered questions relating to the propensity and causality of poor mental health amongst PhD researchers. Reporting on a new comparative survey of PhD researchers and their peers from different professions, Dr Cassie M…

Is doing a PhD bad for your mental health? — Impact of Social Sciences

Are College Students Censoring Themselves?

POSTED BY HANK REICHMAN Michael Hobbes, a journalist based in Berlin, has a substack site, “Confirm My Choices,” where he regularly posts commentary on a variety of topics.  Today he posted a piece, “Lies, Damn Lies and ‘Self-Censorship’ Statistics,” that really hit the nail on the head about the much-ballyhooed “Campus Free Speech Crisis.”  I’m […]

Are College Students Censoring Themselves? — ACADEME BLOG

Why do we forget? New theory proposes ‘forgetting’ is actually a form of learning

Yesterday, my good friend and mentor Paul Kirschner already shared this new article. No, it’s not about Ebbinghaus, but about a new theory about what is happening in our brain. Or is it? Ebbinghaus is mentioned already in the introduction :). From the press release: We create countless memories as we live our lives but […]

Why do we forget? New theory proposes ‘forgetting’ is actually a form of learning — From experience to meaning…

Psychology in the Classroom – Fundamental Attribution Error

Teaching psychology has taught me things about humans and learning and the classroom that I wouldn’t have experienced had it not been for the psychology curriculum. I think it important to pass some of these lessons along to teachers so as to improve their own instruction. Some of these lessons introduce particular theories of learning,…

Psychology in the Classroom – Fundamental Attribution Error — The Effortful Educator

Psychology in the Classroom – Curse of Knowledge

Teaching psychology has taught me things about humans and learning and the classroom that I wouldn’t have experienced had it not been for the psychology curriculum. I think it important to pass some of these lessons along to teachers so as to improve their own instruction. Some of these lessons introduce particular theories of learning,…

Psychology in the Classroom – Curse of Knowledge — The Effortful Educator

How retrieval practice works part 1

Evidence for Educators

You’re right to be interested in retrieval practice.

Retrieval practice is the use of low-stakes testing (written/verbal questions) to benefit pupils’ long-term memories (McDaniel at al., 2007). It’s more effective than non-testing methods like re-reading.

Used in conjunction with other effective teaching methods, retrieval practice has the potential to be a powerful tool for teachers.

The value of retrieval has been known for over a century (Myers, 1914).

Positive evidence can be seen –

  • In educational settings (Yang et al., 2021).
  • With college and university-aged pupils (Foss & Pirozzolo, 2017; Thomas et al., 2020).
  • With school-aged pupils (Marsh et al., 2012; McDaniel et al, 2011; Rowley & McCrudden, 2020).
  • With pre-school children (Fritz et al., 2007).
  • Using various materials (Carpenter, 2009; Roediger & Karpicke, 2006; Carpenter & Pashler, 2007).
  • Using various test types (Yang et al, 2021).

But…

Retrieval practice research with real teachers…

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