The state of the learning profession: Neuromyths and (lack of) evidence-informed practice

Mirjam Neelen & Paul A. Kirschner Last month, the Online Learning Consortium published an international report titled Neuromyths and Evidence-Based practice in Higher Education (thanks to Donald Clark for pointing it out on Twitter). The reason for this research is articulated well by Professor Howard-Jones in the Preface. He says: Educators make countless decisions about […]

via The state of the learning profession: Neuromyths and (lack of) evidence-informed practice — 3-Star learning experiences

Students who have unconditional offers more likely to quit

Study finds dropout rate higher among students given easier entry to universityStudents who go to university after receiving an unconditional offer before their A-level results are more likely to drop out in their first year, research shows.Analysis by the Office for Students (OfS), the universities regulator, found that the dropout rate was 10% higher for…

via Students who have unconditional offers more likely to quit — Universities | The Guardian

GUEST POST: Using Colors, Images and Cartoons to Support Learning — Learning Scientists Blog – The Learning Scientists

By Chris Drew Chris Drew, PhD, is an eLearning Advisor and online university teacher. His academic research is focused on instructional design in online contexts. You can get in touch on via his personal blog: https://helpfulprofessor.com or follow him on Twitter: @helpfulprof.An interesting debate has taken place in the past decade over whether learning materials…

via GUEST POST: Using Colors, Images and Cartoons to Support Learning — Learning Scientists Blog – The Learning Scientists

Kentucky’s white minus black achievement gaps from NAEP

The new 2019 NAEP scores have been released, and I’ve already covered several interesting things with a series of blogs on October 30, 2019 with the first one titled New NAEP results for Kentucky also disappoint – Grade 4 Reading. That series also examined Grade 4 math and Grade 8 Reading and Grade 8 Math.…

via Kentucky’s white minus black achievement gaps from NAEP — The Bluegrass Institute for Public Policy Solutions

If we’re serious about changing the world, we need to get our evidence right – A comment on the 2019 Nobel Prize for Economics. — Impact of Social Sciences

The announcement of this year’s Nobel Prize in economics has highlighted divisions within the development economics community, particularly around the efficacy of using Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) as a tool for making social interventions. In this post Gorgi Krlev discusses the pros and cons of experimental approaches in economics and suggests that rather than seeing routes…

via If we’re serious about changing the world, we need to get our evidence right – A comment on the 2019 Nobel Prize for Economics. — Impact of Social Sciences

PHONICS AND KNOWLEDGE — The Concord Review – Will’s Blog

The Epoch Times ‘Balanced Literacy’ is a Poor Way to Teach ReadingMichael ZwaagstraUpdated: November 3, 2019 The reading wars are over, or at least they should be. Unfortunately, they are not.In the late 1960s, Dr. Jeanne Chall, former director of the Harvard Reading Laboratory at Harvard University, compared the phonics and whole language approaches to reading…

via PHONICS AND KNOWLEDGE — The Concord Review – Will’s Blog

ACT for Kentucky’s public and non-public school students over the years — The Bluegrass Institute for Public Policy Solutions

One of our more consistently requested reports Years ago, I started computing scores to answer a frequent question: How do Kentucky’s non-public school students, those in private, parochial and home schools, do on the ACT. The ACT, Inc. does not directly report scores for the non-public group of high school graduates. The ACT, Inc’s own…

via ACT for Kentucky’s public and non-public school students over the years — The Bluegrass Institute for Public Policy Solutions

Fears that new tests will damage four-year-olds ‘unfounded’ — Education | The Guardian

Contentious assessments quietly go ahead despite parents’ concerns and legal challengeWith studious concentration the four-year-old lines up blue plastic bears and counts to five. Then she points to grass in a picture and recognises the letter “g”.She is one of the first children to take the government’s new reception baseline assessments for four and five-year-olds…

via Fears that new tests will damage four-year-olds ‘unfounded’ — Education | The Guardian

A.I. and the Future of Cheating — Schoolinfosystem.org

Matt Bartlett: No matter whether you were a straight-A student at university or more a student of beer pong, it’s extremely unlikely that your positive memories of college took place in an examination hall. Beyond being generally miserable, exams exacerbate anxiety and other mental health issues, and do a poor job of assessing skills like…

via A.I. and the Future of Cheating — Schoolinfosystem.org

Engagement and Interest — Learning Scientists Blog – The Learning Scientists

By Althea Need KaminskeEngagement is a term I hear a lot. Teachers want their students to be more engaged and students want their classes to be more engaging. My fellow faculty members will often lament that students are not doing well in class because they are not engaged – and they want to know what…

via Engagement and Interest — Learning Scientists Blog – The Learning Scientists