The death of the literature review and the rise of the dynamic knowledge map — Impact of Social Sciences

Almost every academic article starts with a literature review. However, although these short research summaries can be beneficial, as discussed in previous posts on the LSE Impact Blog, they also introduce opportunities for unverifiable misrepresentation and self-aggrandizement. In this post Gorgi Krlev proposes that short of abolishing them, or aiming for complete standardization of literature…

via The death of the literature review and the rise of the dynamic knowledge map — Impact of Social Sciences

Retrieval Practices’ Impact on Test Anxiety and Stress — The Effortful Educator

I’m a fan of retrieval practice. When it comes to improving retention of material in the classroom, you’d be hard-pressed to find another strategy that produces better results while also addressing such a diverse set of learners. Here are links to four previous articles I’ve written on this topic: Retrieval practice in the high school…

via Retrieval Practices’ Impact on Test Anxiety and Stress — The Effortful Educator

Principal Gladhand, Dept: Coexistence in The Land of Oz and Kansas

traditional math

With the Common Core annual testing coming up in California, Principal Gladhand’s weekly missive to parents brings good tidings about how his school is dealing with it.

He starts with the age-old premise that tests don’t matter:

We work hard to ensure our students are learning not because we want them to do well on any given test, but because the learning is important. We don’t
work to “teach to the test” or take excessive practice tests to “get our students used to” taking standardized tests. This isn’t teaching for mastery, it’s just teaching about testing.”

He goes on to boast how at his school, a formative assessment approach is used, so that tests don’t really matter. And in so doing, he can’t resist taking a swipe at memorization. And who can blame him when the edu-world around him feels that in this digital age, we can just Google information…

View original post 496 more words

GUEST POST: When Implementing Retrieval and Spaced Practice in the Science Classroom, Change Won’t Happen Overnight — Learning Scientists Blog – The Learning Scientists

By Alison Stone Alison Stone teaches Human Anatomy and Physiology and AP Biology at Central Bucks High School – West in Doylestown, PA. She is a National Board Certified Teacher and the 2015 recipient of the Outstanding Educator Award from Stephenson University. Alison has a passion for using evidence-based practice to improve student outcomes in…

via GUEST POST: When Implementing Retrieval and Spaced Practice in the Science Classroom, Change Won’t Happen Overnight — Learning Scientists Blog – The Learning Scientists

OPINION: America Needs an Independent Presidential Primary in 2020 — IVN.us

OPINION: America Needs an Independent Presidential Primary in 2020 At least 26 million voters in the United States were denied the freedom to vote in the 2016 presidential primary elections. A large portion of these voters were independents. I am assuming that a similar problem occurred in the 2018 mid-term elections. It is time to…

via OPINION: America Needs an Independent Presidential Primary in 2020 — IVN.us

The Butterfly Who Denied Ever Being a Caterpillar: A Modern Day Educational Fable

3-Star learning experiences

Paul A. Kirschner & Mirjam Neelen

Did you hear the story about the butterfly who denied ever being a caterpillar? Well, there was once a beautiful, well-developed butterfly who refused to accept that he once was a caterpillar and that going through the stages from pupa to caterpillar to beautiful butterfly was responsible for his current state…

Almost weekly, we encounter (or are asked to comment on) some new, modern, progressive, child friendly, innovative approach to education. Usually, advocates for these approaches have a strong distaste for knowledge acquisition, fact learning, memorisation, and practising skills such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, spelling, handwriting or writing essays (Who needs all of these things in real life? We have pocket computers for this, and, who writes essays these days?). They find these things to be old-fashioned, demotivating, and extremely mind-numbing. They believe in the child’s own initiative to drive learning as they perceive…

View original post 1,206 more words

PBS News Hour gets it about poor reading instruction and how to fix it — Bluegrass Institute

We’ve written a lot over the years about the massive war concerning which reading instruction approach, phonics-based or Whole Language, works best. The argument should have been pretty much settled after the… 629 more words

via PBS News Hour gets it about poor reading instruction and how to fix it — Bluegrass Institute

Do all children learn differently? — Catherine & Katharine

Yes, all children are different. But our brains are much more similar than different and we all need to learn the same things to turn our nonreading brains into reading brains. “All kids learn to read in different ways” gets heads nodding, but that doesn’t mean it’s true. — Emily Hanford (@ehanford) April 30, 2019 […]

via Do all children learn differently? — Catherine & Katharine

How many words do you need to know? — Catherine & Katharine

Number of word families needed to: Get most things done as a tourist or visitor 1,000 to 2,000 Hold a friendly conversation 6,000 Watch television & movies 3,000 minimum, preferably 6,000 Read fluently (must know 98% of a text’s word families) 3,000 minimum, preferably 6,000 Source: What do you need to know to learn a […]

via How many words do you need to know? — Catherine & Katharine

US Education’s Dominant Research Method: Cherry Picking Evidence — Truth in American Education

We all know about gerrymandering—the process by which politicians in a majority party sit down with a map and carve out electoral boundaries to maximize their party’s electoral advantage. Gerrymandering upends the electoral process. Rather than allow voters to choose their representatives, incumbent politicians choose their voters. More than 90 percent of US congressional elections…

via US Education’s Dominant Research Method: Cherry Picking Evidence — Truth in American Education