Supply your own interpretation, Dept.

traditional math

In this PR piece of yet another “personalized learning” math software, this paragraph stands out:

Zearn Math builds deep understanding of concepts and flexible problem-solving skills through an emphasis on visualization, drawing to solve, and concrete representations of abstract concepts. The curriculum’s focus on inclusivity and accessibility aims to create a sense of belonging in the math classroom for all students by fostering the development of tenacious, lifelong learners. Each day, students learn in flexible and feedback-rich environments and are supported in accessing grade-level math with on-ramps and personalized feedback embedded throughout the curriculum, which includes over 800 digital lessons.

Supply your own interpretation in the comments below. Let’s see what you can come up with. Particularly these key sentences.

Zearn Math builds deep understanding of concepts and flexible problem-solving skills through an emphasis on visualization, drawing to solve, and concrete representations of abstract concepts.

The curriculum’s focus on inclusivity…

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The sun block solution

traditional math

In 1987, then Dept of Interior Secretary Donald P. Hodel when questioned about the deterioration of the ozone layer in the atmosphere suggested that people wear hats, sunglasses and protective sun creams to protect against skin cancer. He was soundly criticized for a statement that addressed the symptoms but not the cause.

A similar attitude is seen in education–particularly math education–from vendors promoting the next shiny new thing designed to cure educational woes. I just finished reading two articles. The first is a PR puff piece written by “guest contributor” praising the program “Teach to One”. It discusses that students who lack foundational skills in math is a big problem–but “personalized learning” offers a solution to this ill.

“It’s difficult to teach a class that engages both lower-ability and higher-ability children because you can’t always address multiple needs simultaneously. Traditional teaching approaches will always leave some students behind.”

Oh, and…

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Students Think the College Board Is Running a Reddit Sting to Catch AP Test Cheaters — Schoolinfosystem.org

Madison Malone Kircher: On May 10, just a few days before Advanced Placement tests were scheduled to begin for high-schoolers around the world, a Reddit user, Dinosauce313, created a new subreddit, APTests2020. Its stated purpose? “A community of students taking the 2020 AP Exams and wanting to use online resources while doing so.” As a…

via Students Think the College Board Is Running a Reddit Sting to Catch AP Test Cheaters — Schoolinfosystem.org

The education gap: is technology helping?

One of the many enforced social experiments resulting from the Coronavirus epidemic around the world is in education. Around 82% of global learners are out of school. Distance learning is now the only option for many, although for some this is easier than others. There has always been debate regarding the effectiveness of Edtech, which […]

via The education gap: is technology helping? — Developing Perspectives

GUEST POST: How Exercise Improves Student Mental Health — Learning Scientists Blog – The Learning Scientists

By Tiarne Kleyn Tiarne Kleyn is a Secondary PDHPE Teacher at Australian Christian College and has a Bachelor of Human Movement and a Bachelor of Secondary Education (PDHPE) from the University of Technology Sydney. On the weekends, you will find her playing AFL (Australian Football League) for the Western Magic.You no doubt realise that exercise…

via GUEST POST: How Exercise Improves Student Mental Health — Learning Scientists Blog – The Learning Scientists

Medieval Universities Costs — educational research techniques

The post will talk about some of the characteristics and costs of university studies during the Medieval time period. Naturally, there are a lot of similarities to modern times. However, many aspects of university life took time to grow and develop as we will see. University Universities during the Middle Ages were distinct from what […]

via Medieval Universities Costs — educational research techniques

A Library Faces Surging Demand during Pandemic Shutdown — Non Profit News | Nonprofit Quarterly

Hwy43 / CC BY-SAMay 20, 2020; Whitecourt Star (Alberta, CA) You can shut down a library building, but you cannot shut down the library. That’s the clear message being sent by the public library in Whitecourt, Alberta, a small town (population 9,500) located about 110 miles northwest of Edmonton. “Though no longer able to wander…

via A Library Faces Surging Demand during Pandemic Shutdown — Non Profit News | Nonprofit Quarterly

More of the same, Dept.

traditional math

Another in a long line of articles with the theme “COVID-19 has pushed parents into learning the Common Core math methods along with their kids”. This particular article asks whether this is good or bad, but comes to the typical ed-journo conclusion that learning the Common Core way is a good thing. Here are some highlights from the article along with some questions I had for anyone who cares to comment.

“Over the past 40 years, education research has emphasized that teaching math should start with building students’ understanding of math concepts, instead of starting with formal algorithms, according to Michele Carney, an associate professor of mathematics education at Boise State University.”

Question 1: What research was this?

Question 2: How has this been working out for the past 40 years?

“Educators say the point of these early-learning strategies is to help kids establish the foundation they need to truly…

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Book Review: The Scopus Diaries and the (Il)Logics of Academic Survival by Abel Polese

In The Scopus Diaries and the (Il)Logics of Academic Survival, Abel Polese helps to demystify many of the inner workings of academia for researchers and the challenges that these present through a FAQ format that readers can dip in and out of to explore topics ranging from organising a panel at a conference to arranging…

via Book Review: The Scopus Diaries and the (Il)Logics of Academic Survival by Abel Polese — Impact of Social Sciences