Never underestimate young children, part 248

Readers of our new book react sometimes surprised by what young children can do. Years of training in Piagetian thinking have led us to underestimate our children. And this new study again shows that they are able to do more than you may think, although parents will recognise a lot. This study shows that young […]

Never underestimate young children, part 248 — From experience to meaning…

Revolutionary ideas: plus ca change, plus c’est la meme chose — Catherine & Katharine

Ongoing claims that schools need an overhaul because they’re based on 19th century models reminded me of this post from 7 years ago. At this point, I’d take Alfred North Whitehead’s observation one step further. When over an extended period of time a variety of people with compelling credentials and affiliations proclaim repeatedly in mainstream […]

Revolutionary ideas: plus ca change, plus c’est la meme chose — Catherine & Katharine

Why facilitated communication and its variants cannot be compared to sign language — Catherine & Katharine

I recently posted this comment at FacilitatedCommunication.org in response to a comment on a post from last October about Penn State’s hosting of a pro-FC event. Given all that’s gone on since Penn State hosted this conference (for example, this), and the persistence of certain problematic claims, I think it’s worth posting here, too. As […]

Why facilitated communication and its variants cannot be compared to sign language — Catherine & Katharine

If you’re facilitated, are you an autistic person or a person with autism? — Catherine & Katharine

We’ve been getting lots of comments at FacilitatedCommunication.org recently, as well as the occasional email message. Not all of them are particularly friendly.  Here is an old post about a message I got a while ago. Even though this comment is not about FC,  and even though FC wasn’t as much on my mind then […]

If you’re facilitated, are you an autistic person or a person with autism? — Catherine & Katharine

How awards, recognition can *decrease* inventors’ creativity

It’s great to get an award for what you did, but… maybe it comes with a price this new study suggests. From the press release: Post-it Notes, Spanx, the iPhone, two-day Prime shipping. From unique gadgets to revolutionary business ideas, the most successful inventions have one thing in common: creativity. But sustaining creativity can be […]

How awards, recognition can *decrease* inventors’ creativity — From experience to meaning…

The Human Rights Case for Open Science — Impact of Social Sciences

You’re writing a grant application, and you want to make a strong case for open science! You’ve seen colleagues use language from human rights treaties to support their arguments for open work in the past: but what does that actually mean? Does international human rights law really say that science should be open? In this…

The Human Rights Case for Open Science — Impact of Social Sciences

Some clarifications about message passing research for FC and its variants

Catherine & Katharine

 In a recent comment on FacilitatedCommunication.org, I wrote:

Any experienced facilitators who are interested in exploring the possibility of ideomotor effects during facilitation will find researchers eager to work with them. Unfortunately, facilitators since the early 1990s have been instructed “don’t test,” and nearly all are compliant with that maxim.

Could it be that the facilitators and parents of facilitated individuals are no longer interested in/curious about exploring the ideomotor effects in FC?

Of course I’m not saying that there are no facilitators/parents who consider themselves to be interested in exploring the ideomotor effects in FC. Indeed, there are such people out there, though in some cases they have alienated potential research partners so much that those particular researchers have no interest in having anything to do with them. Nonetheless, if such a parent/facilitator really wants to, they can certainly find other research partners whom they haven’t alienated.

As…

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Plus c’est la même chose, plus c’est la même choCCSS

Catherine & Katharine

Re my last post, I just recalled another belabored concept: the concept of “the number sentence.” That was the first roadblock my older son encountered in elementary school math. Yes, he can add, subtract, multiply, and divide ahead of grade level…

But,” his teacher added, with great concern, “He doesn’t know what a number sentence is.”


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…And stop belaboring the concept of the equals sign

Catherine & Katharine

My long-time math crony Barry Garelick has recently alerted me to claims about how students don’t understand the “equals” sign and therefore require lessons on the underlying concept of mathematical equality.

(These claims are based on studies that potentially confuse conceptual understanding of the equals sign with the ability to do basic arithmetic or involve additional confounds like the effects of tutoring.)

The notion that teachers should be devoting class time to conceptual understanding of the equals sign reminds me of this old post from Out in Left Field.

Stop belaboring the concepts: the limits of “conceptual understanding”


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Gwinnett GA Teacher of the Year Resignation Speech

deutsch29: Mercedes Schneider's Blog

On May 23, 2022, Lee Allen, Gwinnett County (GA) teacher of the year, announced his resignation from Gwinnett Public Schools at a board meeting.

Man gets teacher of the year, then he says he has to leave. These things ought not to be, especially given that the district’s HR superintendent called this time “the Great Resignation.”

When the teacher of the year chooses to exit, perhaps it’s time for admin to both listen and act.

Allen had roughly three minutes to speak about his reasons for leaving Gwinnett County (not the profession entirely). I transcribed his words, which are captured on the Youtube video at the end of this post.

According to his LinkedIn bio, Allen has been teaching high school math in Geogia for eight years: five in Whitfield County, and three, in Gwinnett County. He also holds certifications in English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and…

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