In teaching, sometimes 1+1≠2! Here’s why.

Paul A. Kirschner & Mirjam Neelen OK, we’re about to begin. I’ve got my slides ready. I’ve made sure that the most important things that I have to say – that is that I feel that my audience should learn – are in the presentation. Interesting headings, bullets with extensive info that they can’t miss, […]

via In teaching, sometimes 1+1≠2! Here’s why. — 3-Star learning experiences

Ignatius (1401-1556) – Jesuit zeal… Give me a boy (don’t take this the wrong way)…

Ignatius Loyola was a Basque soldier turned priest who formed the Jesuits, or Society of Jesus, a missionary order driven by a military-type zeal to spread the Catholic faith. He famously said ‘give me a boy until he is ten, and I’ll give you the man’. Education was to be their primary and most successful…

via Ignatius (1401-1556) – Jesuit zeal… Give me a boy (don’t take this the wrong way)… — Donald Clark Plan B

Luther (1483-1546) – Universal schooling… reform…

In Martin Luther’s call for universal education, literacy was part of his programme for ‘reformation’. It was education, schools and literacy that would put young people in touch with the realities of scripture and knowledge, without the mediating power of a priestly elite. Education would produce individuals who had direct access to the good book…

via Luther (1483-1546) – Universal schooling… reform… — Donald Clark Plan B

Lessons: I Thought I Hated Science Fiction Until I Read it Through Emily’s Eyes

Never Really My Cup of Tea Just this week we finished up our Science Fiction unit for our reading curriculum. It was designed and written by Emily Badillo and includes 8 classic short stories with lots of fantastic knowledge building and writing opportunities. I’m going to tell you a little bit about the unit. And…

via Lessons: I Thought I Hated Science Fiction Until I Read it Through Emily’s Eyes — Teach Like a Champion

Where’s “All that Kentucky education progress” on the NAEP? (Update) — The Bluegrass Institute for Public Policy Solutions

I got another reminder in a message today that many in Kentucky, including a large number of individuals working with the state’s education system in some way or other, simply have no real clue about how little progress the state has made in education since the Kentucky Education Reform Act of 1990 was enacted nearly…

via Where’s “All that Kentucky education progress” on the NAEP? (Update) — The Bluegrass Institute for Public Policy Solutions

GUEST POST: From Knowledge To Skill: Do Learning Strategies Improve Critical Thinking? — Learning Scientists Blog

By Dr. Lauren Bellaera Dr. Lauren Bellaera is the Director of Research and Impact at The Brilliant Club, a UK-based charity that aims to increase the number of pupils from under-represented backgrounds that progress to highly-selective universities. Lauren is also a part-time Associate Lecturer at Birkbeck, University of London. Before joining The Brilliant Club, Lauren held postdoctoral research…

via GUEST POST: From Knowledge To Skill: Do Learning Strategies Improve Critical Thinking? — Learning Scientists Blog – The Learning Scientists

Collecting cell phones looks harder than it is — Catherine & Katharine

For the longest time, where cell phones in the classroom were concerned, I was paralyzed. I wanted to take them away, but I didn’t think I could or should. My students were adults, what business did I have taking their phones? And supposing I did collect phones, what would I do with them? Where would I put […]

via Collecting cell phones looks harder than it is — Catherine & Katharine

The Illusion of Multitasking and its Impact on Learning — The Effortful Educator

Currently, I am sitting in the waiting room while my daughter is in her ballet class. I am inundated with distractions; the conversations around me, small children playing, and a large television broadcasting my adorable daughter’s class for all to see while waiting. My attention is constantly pulled from one mental task to the next.…

via The Illusion of Multitasking and its Impact on Learning — The Effortful Educator

A long-term rise and recent decline in intelligence test performance: The Flynn Effect in reverse

Thomas Teasdale and David Owen: In the 1980s reviewed evidence indicated that, through the preceding decades of the last century, population performance on intelligence tests had been rising substantially, typically about 3–5 IQ points per decade, in developed countries. The phenomenon, now termed the ‘Flynn Effect’, has been variously attributed to biological and/or to social…

via A long-term rise and recent decline in intelligence test performance: The Flynn Effect in reverse — Schoolinfosystem.org

Improved education financial transparency now at risk thanks to new state board’s decision

The questionably reconstituted Kentucky Board of Education isn’t wasting much time putting to waste one of the more important efforts of the board that was improperly replaced. Multiple reporters Tweeted out from the new board’s meeting today that the Finance Committee initiated by the ousted board is being disbanded. That’s a huge mistake. There are…

via Improved education financial transparency now at risk thanks to new state board’s decision — The Bluegrass Institute for Public Policy Solutions