Hiatus, the Book, and the Metric System

Image from Pixabay: https://pixabay.com/users/geralt-9301/ Earlier this year I indicated that I planned to have a draft of the book (America’s Biggest Miscalculation) done by the end of the year. In July I was able to sit down and generate a pretty solid outline. I’ve been mulling it over ever since. Now, my dear friends, is […]

Hiatus, the Book, and the Metric System — More Than A Mile Behind: America and the Metric System

Vocational education to the rescue —

The high drop-out rate among college students should be convincing evidence that not everyone is college material.  That’s why Future Schools, which is based on the Swiss apprenticeship model, needs to be adopted (“Education and climate are at stake,” Los Angeles Times, Aug.30). Starting at age 14, high school students would pursue a vocational curriculum […]

Vocational education to the rescue —

Highlighting with a Purpose

Highlighters. Some people love them. Some people hate them. Many people misuse them. In my classroom, I see highlighters as a force for good (learning)…when they’re used correctly. I instruct my students on some effective strategies to get more out of their usage of highlighters. Most students use highlighters as they study or take notes…

Highlighting with a Purpose — The Effortful Educator

A new series: Teaching traditional math

traditional math

The term “traditional math” or “traditionally taught math” is fraught with images and connotations. The picture that many have when hearing the term “traditional math” is a classroom in which seats are arranged in straight rows, the teacher stands at the front of the room and lectures non-stop for the duration of the class, students learn all procedures and problem solving methods by rote, and no background on the conceptual underpinnings of same are presented. Topics are presented in isolated fashion with no connections with any other topics, so that students are prevented from seeing how one mathematical idea may relate to another. Word problems are dull and uninteresting and students do not feel any desire to try and solve them. They have no bearing on any aspect of students’ lives, and all information needed to solve the problem are contained within the problem itself. Problem sets (commonly called “practice…

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After the Storm: Waiting.

deutsch29: Mercedes Schneider's Blog

Today marked the fifth day since Hurricane Ida made landfall as a Category 4 (almost 5) storm in southern Louisiana.

The experience has altered my concept of time.

First is the waiting for electricity to be restored to my residence. That’s the big wait that is on everyone’s minds. However, when the quieting reality sets in that the big wait is one of weeks, not days (and certainly not hours), then many smaller yet critical waits become a central life focus. For example, I learned that a particular grocery gets an ice delivery in the mornings. I was told 10AM, only to discover the following morning that ice was unexpectedly delivered early and I’d missed it. No bagged ice for my fridge and freezer that day. So, the next morning, I awoke early so that I might arrive at the grocery before 8AM so that I could wait. And that’s…

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McClay — A Distant Elite: How Meritocracy Went Wrong — David Labaree on Schooling, History, and Writing

This post is an essay by Wilfred M. McClay, published in Hedgehog Review in 2016. which explores the problems with meritocracy.  Here’s a link to the original.  This is an issue I’ve explored a lot in this blog (see the list here), and I’ll be coming back to it again from time to time. It’s […]

McClay — A Distant Elite: How Meritocracy Went Wrong — David Labaree on Schooling, History, and Writing

David Brooks: How the Meritocrats Broke America — David Labaree on Schooling, History, and Writing

This post is a new piece by David Brooks, recently published online at Atlantic.  Here’s a link to the original. He’s writing about the way the meritocratic elite — grounded in exclusive educational credentials — has upended the American class structure.   The class structure of Western society has gotten scrambled over the past few decades. […]

David Brooks: How the Meritocrats Broke America — David Labaree on Schooling, History, and Writing

Bradi Bair’s Cold Calling Models Positivity and Rigor

I’ve spent much of this week watching the first batch of video from school year 2021-22 classrooms. Watching classrooms with everyone masked is a bit disconcerting at first but it’s remarkable how quickly things feel closer to normal. Familiar interactions and relationships don’t take long to seem… well… familiar. And already there’s so much to…

Bradi Bair’s Cold Calling Models Positivity and Rigor — Teach Like a Champion

When is grade retention helpful? (Best Evidence in Brief

There is a new Best Evidence in Brief and this time I picked this study from this biweekly newsletter written up by Justin Hill because it’s a very hot topic in my language region: Mieke Goos and colleagues recently conducted a meta-analysis of the effectiveness of grade retention practices in OECD countries. This adds to an already […]

When is grade retention helpful? (Best Evidence in Brief — From experience to meaning…